BREASTFEEDING CHALLENGES AND TIPS

Breastfeed your baby as soon as possible after birth. Baby needs to breastfeed 10 or more times in 24 hours. The more often your baby breastfeeds, the more milk you will make.
 

LATCHING ON

  • Sit or lean back comfortably.

  • The front of baby’s body should touch the front of your body. 

  • Have your nipple touch baby’s nose – this can help baby open wide for a deep latch.

  • Pull baby as close as possible to you when baby is ready to latch.

COLOSTRUM IS THE SPECIAL MILK YOU MAKE IN THE FIRST FEW DAYS TO PROTECT YOUR BABY FROM ILLNESS.

  • Baby only needs small amounts at a time.
     

BABY NEEDS NIGHT FEEDINGS

Breastmilk digests easily and quickly. This is why babies wake up at night to eat.

  • Breastfeeding at night helps to make more milk.

  • You can make night feeds easier by keeping your baby close by.

ENGORGEMENT

  • Use cold compresses or cabbage leaves between feedings to reduce swelling.

  • Use warm compresses before feeding.

  • Soften your breasts by hand-expressing some milk.

  • Breastfeed often!

MILK TOO WEAK?

Never! Your milk changes during the feed. Express a few drops before and after a feed to see the difference. The milk at the start of the feed is watery to satisfy baby’s thirst. The milk during the feed is creamy to satisfy baby’s hunger.
 

SORE NIPPLES

Breastfeeding should not hurt – ask for help if breastfeeding is difficult or painful. Breastfeeding in a comfortable position and with a deep latch can help prevent sore nipples. Offer the less painful side first.

 

BLOCKED DUCT AND MASTITIS (MILK FEVER)

If a milk duct becomes blocked, a tender lump may appear in the breast.

  • Check baby’s position at the breast

  • Breastfeed frequently

  • Apply a warm compress

If a part of the breast becomes hard, red, painful, and swollen, you might have mastitis (milk fever). You might feel a slight fever or body aches and chills, like when you have the flu. Feed often and rest. If you do not start to feel better within 48 hours, you may need an antibiotic. Your clinic or doctor will prescribe an antibiotic that is safe during breastfeeding.

 

THRUSH

Thrush is a fungal infection. You might have itchy, flaky, or red nipples. Your baby may have white coatings on the inside of his gums, cheeks, lips, and tongue. Treatment for both mother and baby may be needed. Your clinic can give you and your baby an antifungal medicine. It is safe to continue breastfeeding. Wash and sterilise all artificial teats and dummies thoroughly if you are using them.